Restoring Old Documents

Saying ' I Do ' in 1887

This marriage certificate is from Ontario Canada,circa 1887
Click to see a larger picture

 

A picture of the restored certificate
Click to see a larger picture

 

I was honoured when I was asked to work on a marriage certificate from the late 19th Century. The original certificate is in two separate pieces and is so fragile that it could not be taken out of the album where it had been for years. I took a photograph of each page and worked from that.
The marriage certificate is from Ontario Canada,circa 1887

It is a few years since I restored the marriage document, so I can't remember everything I did. I know I searched the Internet for hours to find a font which matched the original.There was a lot of cloning went on to rebuild the edges. When I work on something which is this damaged, it can take a long time. I keep going back to it.


The Bride
ATintype Photograph from 1887



The Groom
ATintype Photograph from 1887

I was told by the granddaughter of this bride and groom, that they were both 17 on their wedding day.

These tintype photographs were inserted into the marriage certificate.
Outside of museums, these are the only tintypes I have ever seen.

They are from the 1887 marriage certificate. The tintypes withstood the test of time much better than the actual marriage certificate. All I had to do was deepen the contrast.The tintypes were not even scratched. I was told by the granddaughter of this bride and groom that they were both 17 on their wedding day. The tintype photos were quite small , but the quality was so good that they enlarged very well .The granddaughter now has these photographs proudly dispalyed in a double frame .

Tintype photos, as the name implies, were photos with the image on a metal surface, rather than on glass or paper. The tintype process or ferrotype process evolved from the ambrotype. It was invented by Prof. Hamilton Smith of Ohio in 1856.
read more at

www.edinphoto.org.uk

 

 

 

My great uncle Bill sent this postcard photograph to his sister, my grandmother, in 1916. The post office stamp is very clear.I blocked out the personal info, thinking it not wise to post it on the Internet.

Here is an interesting website which has information to help people date their photographs.

www.rogerco.freeserve.co.uk

My mum and her grandmother, mum is holding her baby brother.
around 1930.

Check out my other websites